National Geographic

Mule-ology

Near Siverek, Turkey, 37°46'32" N, 39°16'22" E

First things first: A mule is not a donkey.

A donkey is a member of the equine family burdened by low self-esteem: a small, modest, long-eared creature from which mules are bred when mated with a horse. In other words, a donkey is the crude base metal from which a superior alloy—the mule—is forged. To call a mule a donkey, then, is at best a beginner’s mistake that will earn the squinting contempt of veteran muleskinners. At worst, they are fighting words.

There are jack mules (male) and jenny or molly mules (female). There are blue mules, cotton mules, sugar mules, and mining mules. There is a mammoth mule that weighs a thousand pounds. George Washington was a mule breeder. But all mules are immune to politics. There is no idealistic mule.

Photograph by John Stanmeyer

Maybe she will, maybe she won’t. Photograph by John Stanmeyer

Being hybrids, mules are biologically sterile, which helps explain their dispositions: angry at the world.

The Mexicans have a saying: Una mula piensa por lo menos siete veces al día como matar el amo. “A mule thinks at least seven times a day how to kill its master.” This is doubtless an exaggeration. Nobody, however, disagrees with the drift of this aphorism.

Mules do not tolerate names.

This fact might surprise the lay public. True, one can call a mule anything one wishes. Our white jenny, for example, has been baptized differently by each of my walking partners across Turkey. Deniz Kilic called her Barbara for reasons only he can explain. Mustafa Filiz dubbed her Sunshine. Murat Yazar calls her Sweetie. John Stanmeyer, my photographer colleague, refers to her as Snowflake. My preference is Kirkatir, a Turkish name meaning “grey mule.” It is the original moniker bestowed by her previous owner, an Alevi woodcutter from the forested hills above Mersin. The truth is that, like all mules, she answers to no label meted out by mere humans. Kirkatir does not come when called, or when whistled to. She comes when she feels like it. This is not very often.

Kirkatir is 22 years old.

Photograph by John Stanmeyer

Mules eat everything. (One of my cargo mules in Jordan, Selwa, ate my Bedouin guide’s walking stick.) Photograph by John Stanmeyer

How old is this in mule years? About five millennia. Walking along a trail with Kirkatir is like trekking with the oldest living being on the planet Earth: It is like taking a Sunday stroll while tethered to a redwood or a bristlecone pine tree. When I first took her for a test walk, back in July, I noticed that her hide was wrinkled around the edges of the packsaddle. “How old is she?” I asked the owner. The owner, Ahmed, looked heavenward. He held up his palms. He shrugged his shoulders. Ahmed was a passable thespian. Her documents, procured after the sale, spelled out the truth.

“She’s not that old,” sniffed Deniz Kilic, who had agreed to her purchase before I arrived in Turkey, and who now felt responsible. Deniz spent the first afternoon of the walk in Turkey peering grimly down into his smart phone. He was looking hard for a Web site that would attest that mules could live for 50 years, or perhaps even a century.

Mules eat everything.

On a cross-country foot journey, this tolerant belly is a useful quality. Horses are much too finicky. That said, the mulish appetite does have its disadvantages. In Jordan, where I traveled with cargo mules, one of the animals, Selwa, ate my Bedouin guide Hamoudi Enwaje’ al Bedul’s walking stick. Walking sticks are very hard to come by in empty deserts. Hamoudi cursed Selwa. Days later, after much intense searching, he at last found another stick. Selwa ate that one, too.

Mules are smarter than horses.

This is a well-known fact about the mule race. Mules, for instance, take no unnecessary chances. Look into a mule’s dark, benthic eyeballs: You will detect quadratic equations cascading down like plankton behind their depthless retinas. Mules are forever calculating their odds. Kirkatir is a careful mule. She observes all posted traffic laws. She stops at all speed bumps installed on roads to slow automobiles. She does this for a very long time.

One afternoon, Deniz and I walked into a veterinarian’s office outside of the Turkish city of Gaziantep. We needed an expert opinion.

Photograph by John Stanmeyer

Walking with Kirkatir (aka Snowflake, and many other honorifics) is like trekking with the planet’s oldest living being. Photograph by John Stanmeyer

“We have a problem with our mule,” we informed the animal doctor, a thin, appraising young man who stood behind the counter in a white medical smock. “Our mule does this strange thing all night long. Whenever we tie her to a tree at a camp, she paces back and forth—yes, back and forth—constantly. She does this odd dance.”

And then, Deniz and I reenacted, to the best of our ability, the rumba of Kirkatir: Standing elbow to elbow, we took three steps forward, tossed our heads dramatically—in a wide, clockwise circle—and then took three steps back. Perhaps, we asked the vet, our mule suffered an obscure mule neurosis? Was she a mule insomniac? Was our mule insane?

We repeated these steps three or four times. For clarity’s sake. For an accurate diagnosis.

The vet’s eyes zigzagged between us and a crowd of people growing at the open clinic door. No, the vet said at last. Our mule, he assured us, was perfectly normal.

There are 100 Comments. Add Yours.

  1. Sonja Kodric
    December 11, 2014

    Ha! Love the humour. And great video, so natural. Good thoughts and wishes go ou to you.

  2. Shruti Agrawal
    December 11, 2014

    Well Done!Paul Salopek

  3. tom
    December 11, 2014

    paul, I think the burro (donkey) contributes the more significant attributes of the mule. caution (not stubbornness as accused by many), heat/cold tolerance, cast iron digestive systems, surefootedness. I suppose the horse injects some speed, but not sure what else? say paul, are you gonna include your further mule travels in your possible forthcoming book, mule diaries, or will that book be a sole and separate effort?

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      “Mule Diaries” will be published after the walk books, Tom. One mule at a time.

  4. Bonnie Lynch
    December 11, 2014

    Pablo! I love this! So beautifully written, Snowflake! xo Bon

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      “Snowflake” just doesn’t have a Clint Eastwood ring to it, Bon.

  5. sue from british columbia
    December 11, 2014

    Heard you on CBC yesterday. I love feeling connected to this. Re mules: When my father was a boy before the first world war, they had a family mule, named Bill. A member of the family, included in many family stories. In one, my father, a baby, fell somehow and rolled under Bill’s feet. Panic that the mule would step on the baby. Bill stood patiently while baby was rescued. When the war came, both the oldest brother and Bill went off to the army. The brother came home. They never heard what happened to Bill.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      Sue: Your great family anecdote brings to mind a couple related tales about animals in war—something that is fading from human consciousness. (K-9 units aside.) The first is Hemingway’s acrid little story “On the Quai at Smyrna.” And then there’s the recent, celebrated play “War Horse.”

  6. Tim Degrinney
    December 11, 2014

    It would appear you prefer Camel to Mule as walking companion. Your commentary on the camel seemed more sympathetic last December. Enjoy the walk.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      On the contrary. I admire each for their strengths, Tim. It’s just that mules make better straight men.

  7. Lesley
    December 11, 2014

    As always an interesting and empathetic post. Such a treat to hear you on CBC yesterday. Good health and safe travels to you, Deniz and Kirkatir.

  8. Barbara
    December 11, 2014

    A mule christened with my name by Deniz Kilic! Wonderful ( I hope).

  9. Bonnie
    December 11, 2014

    .

  10. Tom Tang
    December 11, 2014

    I am a fan now, after listening to you on the Current on CBC. Going back to all your previous posts to catch up. Be safe and looking forward to following your historic Walk

  11. Bud Gaudreau
    December 11, 2014

    Your’s is the best storytelling I’ve read since Mark Twain. Thanks, Paul, for the laugh today and the lesson on mules.

  12. David A. Henderson
    December 11, 2014

    Mules are incredible creatures. I have ridden to the bottom of the Grand Canyon three times on a little old mule named B.B. Each time she got a little more obstinate. I would go with her again anytime if I could. On my first trip I told my wife I wanted to take B.B. home, the airline probably not allow that.

  13. Sabine
    December 11, 2014

    Reading your reports and stories by other travellers, it seems that travelling with an animal offers a different, unique insight. I wonder?

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      It changes the experience fundamentally, Sabine, as I’ve noted before.

  14. Mabvillage
    December 11, 2014

    poor Hamoudi,he just wanted a walking sick

  15. Tevan
    December 11, 2014

    Humorous and funny post…loved it…the expression: “All mules are immune to politics”.

  16. barbara
    December 11, 2014

    pure delicious delight. thank you. as always, safe travels. yes, especially with kirkatir.

  17. Jogos Da Elsa
    December 12, 2014

    Walking is also quite effective gymnastics
    http://www.jogosdaelsa.com

  18. N.Raghav
    December 12, 2014

    Hi Paul ,
    Raghav here really interested to know about you . Our school is doing a project about you and I wish you a safe journey ahead and hello to those cute mules 🙂

  19. Jim G
    December 12, 2014

    Mr. Salopek, Great post; brought a smile to my face. Thanks & stay hale and hearty! Namaste.

  20. Trudi S
    December 12, 2014

    Love your journal , a great writer with such insight and interesting chatter. I will b keeping a watchful eye over the forthcoming months & years. Safe travels my friend, may the kindly ones watch over you

  21. Shelly young
    December 12, 2014

    Yes, they are intelligent creatures. I was a trainer for a donkey rescue and never underestimated the smarts, cunning and donkey humor of these remarkable animals. I was flummoxed too many times and I swear they laughed at me, hee haw!

  22. Diane S
    December 12, 2014

    You are right 22 years is like 5 millennia. Shame on Ahmed

  23. oishee dasgupta
    December 13, 2014

    WOW Paul,well done and all the best!!!!

  24. lorna ellema
    December 13, 2014

    Can’t get enough of your posts…

  25. Culex
    December 13, 2014

    As someone said,I really think the camel would be a worthy companion for all your adventures. Loyalty and honesty that a mule’s eyes exude don’t seem to be appreciated.Get a 2 humped camel so you don’t fall off and stay safe!

  26. Maggie
    December 13, 2014

    You had Ollie in giggles (giggles!) the morning this email came in, and I first heard it as he read it aloud to us here in the cubicle farm. You make my day on a regular basis with this epic tromp. Stay safe, wonderful Paul!

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      I suspect Ollie must have been suffering a flashback to an earlier story, Maggie—when a big jack mule bucked me off on the very first day of a 2,000-kilometer mule journey through Mexico, breaking my nose, and knocking me out cold.

  27. Christine Mellroth
    December 13, 2014

    Thank you,thank you,thank you! As always I await your simple stories framed as pure poetry! I am envious of the people that were able to listen to you on CBC! Stay safe, awaiting the next post……

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      Thanks, Christine. The CBC interview is archived on their site. And a new chat with Steve Inskeep at NPR is also available online.

  28. Carlos González S
    December 13, 2014

    I always enjoy your tales…
    finally our lives are just that: a tale, a story.
    Yo made me remind that old mexican saying: ” La mula no era arisca, los palos la hicieron…”

  29. Ose Krüger
    December 13, 2014

    Starting the day by reading your report on Mules,especially Kirkatir,put a smile on my face.Here in Australia / Adelaide we have not heard of your walk.I stumbled onto it by sheer luck.I went into archive and have cought up from the beginning.Because of my interest and admiration for you journey quite a few friends are now also followers.Thank you for all the past and future writings.As many other people have written,I also wish you good health and continued vision for this epic walk.Blessings to you,Ose

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      Thanks for reading along, Ose. I’ve picked fruit in the farm country northeast of you. Adelaide was where we farmworkers used to blow our slender wages. There’s nothing lonelier than the sound of your first orange bouncing into a one-ton bin.

  30. Kat ONeil
    December 13, 2014

    Yes having a “weaving” Mule all night long would frustrate me too! I’ve had many a horse who would do that!! And you have described their personality so eloquently I might add!!!

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      Thanks for the tip, Kat. The power of crowd sourcing. I was unaware of weaving behavior. It must be at least partly gene-based, because if any animal has no reason to get bored, it’s Kirkatir. She is always accompanied, and sees new ground every single day.

  31. Kavana Anklekar
    December 14, 2014

    Dear Mr Paul,
    Mules really are fascinating animals however simple they may look. I love learning about animals. Animals can sometimes be very useful and sometimes may cause a lot of havoc. In India Mules are mostly found in hilly regions and not in plains. As I live in Maharashtra, a beautiful state in India I have never spotted a mule.
    Your humorous post about the half donkey-half horse was very informative. Thank you so much for enlightening us on mule-ology. I liked the photos. I even saw the video and I do have a question in my mind. How do the nails not hurt the mule when you fix the horse shoe to its foot?

    Hope you have a safe journey with snowflake! thank you Sir for this wonderful post.
    Kavana Anklekar

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      To: Rhagav, Kavana, Bala, Aryan, Karan, Darshan, Oshin and all the other friends from the school in India. Thank you for writing in. Have your teacher or school administrator look at the Web sites of the walk’s two education partners: The Pulitzer center on Crisis Reporting and Project Zero’s “Out of Eden Learn” platform. Those are better places to interact in a classroom setting. You will find many useful learning tools there. And we can even arrange a Skype interaction through those partners if you wish.

  32. BMG a
    December 14, 2014

    in your translation master or owner would be dueno. Amo is love. Lol maybe referring to the fact they can’t reproduce.

    • tom
      December 14, 2014

      bmg, amo is indeed a “master” of the mule. Spanish beside being the prettiest language on the planet has a certain flexibility in word usage. kinda neat to use amo which does infer love. but we love our mules and burros!

  33. Regina Hart
    December 14, 2014

    What a delightful post! Thanks for sharing a moment of levity.

  34. Patricia Walsh
    December 14, 2014

    My heart still is with you as you walk.So is our mule’s….

  35. bala
    December 15, 2014

    hi paul,
    Hope you are enjoying your journey.Our school has decided that
    when you reach your new milestone we will celebrate in our

    school.Please interact with me.Happy journy

  36. Ruth Kilday
    December 15, 2014

    On a 30 day journey with a donkey and its grub, you’ll have food left for one day on the 30th day. A horse would eat the entire allotment on the first day if allowed. Mules are so smart.

  37. Aryan Choudhary
    December 15, 2014

    hey Paul are you happy to travel with the mules & i even didn’t understood that video…..and hello to you N. Raghav you said i did it…..

  38. Aryan Choudhary
    December 15, 2014

    hey Paul you doing a nice job keep it up & as Kavana and Raghav said be safe and get going…..and I study in their class only

  39. Karan Arora
    December 15, 2014

    hey paul mules are very cute but sometimes dangerous so i wish you a very safe journey and best of luck .

  40. Karan Arora
    December 15, 2014

    Paul you are doing a good work …..and i actually study in Aryan and Raghav’s class.

  41. darshan rao
    December 15, 2014

    hello sir,
    I just want to ask you one question about your travel . can you pleas tell me that would you like to call your journalism a slow journalism or would you like to call it any other kind of journalism I hope you reply .and I like the way u are trying to explore the world and sharing the in information with us . well going keep it up and have a safe journey.

  42. darshan rao
    December 15, 2014

    🙂

  43. Oshin
    December 15, 2014

    Hi sir !! This was your best post so far as it it was so interesting

  44. Cynthia Barry
    December 15, 2014

    Dear Paul,

    Here are some comments from my 5th grade class:

    Scott: Greetings, Paul. LOL to the mule dance. I would die to see that! My class reenacted that. Good luck, Paul.

    Preston: You explained that mules are lazy animals that will eat a walking stick in a second. And stand at a speed bump for two years.

    Alex: I didn’t know all that stuff about mules. I didn’t know the difference between a donkey and a mule. They look the same to me.

    Dominic: I like how you did the mule dance. Your story was so funny. Please make more stories about mules. I liked it!

    Wesley: Hello, Paul. I laughed out loud when we read your Dispatch in class. That dance was great. I did it!
    Now I know that mules stop at speed bumps. I liked your writing. Write more. P.S. I learned that a mule can eat everything. Good luck!

    Christopher: We all did the mule dance. I have one question: Is your mule going to stay with you for the rest of your walk?

    Livia: Dear Paul, I have never heard of a mule. Why did you take a mule with you on your journey?

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      So glad to have your class walking along, Cindy. Mules can teach us a lot of things. They are patient. They clean their plates. They may forgive but never forget. And they are expert on the Danish philosopher Kierkegaard. (You guys can wait a few years before catching up with mules on that one.)

  45. Nihal Hebbar
    December 15, 2014

    Dear Mr Paul,

    First of all I would like to congratulate you because you set off on an exceptional geographical journey which hardly anyone had ever taken before. Your blogs are pretty interesting and knowledgeable. I am thrilled about the pictures, videos displayed in your blog and would like to get associated with you in your journey in future if I get an opportunity. Anyway I would like to share this link for all those who are interested in knowing more about the mules in India. http://www.factfish.com/statistic-country/india/mules.
    It gives the information about the population of mules over a period in India. By doing this I feel happy that I could able to contribute towards your journey and want get involved in the same.

    All the Best in your all future endeavor

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      Thanks for your efforts, Nihal. Feel free to share your resources.

  46. Kristy
    December 15, 2014

    Love this. I’ve always wanted to know more about mules and thanks to slow journalism and Paul’s wit, now I do 🙂 Thank you for walking the world and bringing it to everyone. Kristy, Mill Valley

  47. Onni Milne
    December 15, 2014

    Like so many others, I laughed when I read this posting. Thank you for giving the world an opportunity to explore land and people who are often ignored and misunderstood. This exercise is an opportunity for the whole world to be connected. That is becoming clear as I read the Comments section for each posting.

  48. Kim McIntyre
    December 15, 2014

    Do you plan to cross all of asia with Kirkatir? (That’s a loooooong way for “the oldest living being on the planet earth”)
    Any chance you’ll get a Llama when you get to the Americas?
    I’ve just spent the weekend catching up on your dispatches for the last few months. Your writing is delicious! I’m also fascinated by the stories people share in the comments area. I love how you are connecting people all around the globe. I also admire how diplomatic you are with those who critique you in the comments section!
    I appreciate your every step, and the gift of experience you share with us all.
    With wonder & gratitude,
    Kim from Florida

    • tom
      December 15, 2014

      kim McIntyre, the best animal to pack with is either the mule or the humble burro. llamas “can’t cut the mustard” in the heat. can’t carry the weight that a burro or mule can……can’t tolerate the drastic changes in climate from cold to hot…..burros and to an xtent mules have cast iron digestive systems too that accommodate your trip better……

  49. Aakash p
    December 16, 2014

    it is amazing project and best of luck paul for your journey

  50. saad bellary
    December 16, 2014

    Hi Paul
    You are doing a great job .you are my inspiration for my higher growth.You are a big inspiration for every child in our school .Hope you are enjoying your journey……

  51. swarali kale
    December 16, 2014

    hi…. I really enjoy your blogs.They are really interesting.Ienjoyed learning about mules..

  52. kumar
    December 16, 2014

    i really enjoyed your blogs

  53. yash
    December 16, 2014

    hi…..how are you
    paul we feel lucky to read your blogs

  54. Harshal
    December 16, 2014

    Yes,oshin you are right. It is really interesting

  55. ali haider
    December 16, 2014

    Dear paul

    I would say thanks to you because of you i could know what is happening in the world.i am really enjoying your blogs,the one of mother river.

  56. aman
    December 16, 2014

    sir you are doing an very intresting job
    best of luck!our school is following
    the orbis school

    • Paul Salopek
      December 18, 2014

      Thanks for following along, Orbis School. Again—have your teachers take a look at the education links cited above. Warm regards.

  57. Ali Haider
    December 16, 2014

    Hi Paul, the blog you wrote about the mule is very interesting and i wish you a very good luck for your journey.

  58. Shruti Agrawal
    December 16, 2014

    Hi Paul,
    A very interesting project.Well Done !All the best.Hope you are enjoying your journey.Have a safe journey ahead!

  59. AMAN SINGH
    December 17, 2014

    SIR you are really doing a challenging
    job.Your blogs are very intresting.
    you have let us kno

  60. Sandy
    December 17, 2014

    I just recently found this unbeatable adventure. I wish you great success and your well-being.

  61. Cynthia Barry
    December 18, 2014

    Dear Paul,

    Thanks for your response. Here are some words to you from the other half of 5th grade.

    Jack: Dear Paul, You said in your Dispatch that mules will stop at traffic signals and speed bumps. Are there any of those in your journey? Where are you in your journey?

    Henry: Why did you choose a mule in your journey instead of another animals? What other animals might you use in your trek?

    Sam: How fast can mules run? Does your mule ever run? Or just dance?

    Owen: Do you ever get scared that your mule will wander off?

    Zach: Hi, Paul! Your dance made me LOL. It was fun reenacting that! Have a safe journey.

    Aaron: I thought that Dispatch was interesting. Mules and goats need to start an Eat-Everything Club. I’m not so sure they’d get along, though.

  62. Emily Papazian
    December 18, 2014

    This is an amazing story! I can’t wait to here more from you! My heart is with you as you walk.

  63. free-frozen-games
    December 18, 2014

    I would say thanks to you because of you i could know what is happening in the world.i am really enjoying your blogs,the one of mother river. Free frozen games

  64. Mulally
    December 18, 2014

    The speed diplomacy used in replying to all our comments is heartwarming.Thanks for all the information on Mules . Enjoy the sunshine and don’t be afraid of sunsets.I still wonder as others do- Do you think your mule would ever abandon you?

  65. Bryce Anderson
    December 19, 2014

    This is a terrific project and like others I chuckled at the mule entry. My Dad grew up using both horses and mules in doing farm work. He said that while the horses would start out faster, the mules knew how to pace themselves and so actually could work longer as the day went on. Thanks again and best to you.

  66. Kate
    December 19, 2014

    They may be smarter (not sure), but they are more sure-footed. A mule’s vision encompasses all four hooves while a horse can only see his or her front hooves.

  67. swarali
    December 20, 2014

    Hi sir…. You r really doing a great job ,exploring the world must be thrilling..I have a question about mules. U said that mules think 7 times a day how to kill its master.That means it may be harmful.. Right??or this is not true?… I hope u would reply me..

  68. Shruti Agrawal
    December 20, 2014

    Hi Sir,
    I am very happy to get this kind of project.A very interesting project.I am doing this kind of project for first time in my life.You are doing a job which no one has yet started.I would like to thank you that because of you i am getting to know the different cities across the globe.
    You are exploring the world.Our school is following you.
    Wishing you a happy,enjoyable and a safe journey ahead!

  69. Hannah Combe
    December 20, 2014

    Dear Paul (or Mr. Salopek, should you prefer),

    Hello! I read on NPR that you are going to be hunkering down in Tbilisi for the winter. I am currently serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in Georgia and was wondering if you would have any free time in your hibernation to have a conversation about your long walk and about your experiences in Georgia? I would love to have tea if you were free.

    All best,

    Hannah Combe

    I read on NPR that you are going to be hunkering down in Tbilisi for the winter.

  70. hiya pandey
    December 21, 2014

    Dear Mr Paul,
    My name is Hiya and I study in the orbis school . our school has decided to follow you and learn more things about the places you have or are going to visit .We will be glad to invite you and learn more things about our own country India . I loved the post half donkey – half horse . as I have interest in learning about the animals I found it very informative . keep sending your blogs . good luck to you .
    from ,
    Hiya

  71. hiya pandey
    December 21, 2014

    dear Mr. Paul ,
    I had a question in my mind.
    I thought when our school would invite you then I may ask you the question . you are the only one to do such a great job . so from where did you get the idea of starting a journey of 7 long years and travelling the world and getting learning more about it ?
    second question –
    what do you think about how people are thinking of your journey ?
    please do answer.
    from ,
    Hiya

  72. Marie
    December 21, 2014

    I wanted to know why have you named this post mule logy, because you are talking about a mule with whom you are traveling and telling the difference between a donkey,what is the logic?

  73. Derek
    December 21, 2014

    Love the article .Completely sympathize, with the Mule ! love them .

  74. Chirag.k
    December 22, 2014

    Hi sir here Chirag I am interested in reading your blogs

  75. Chirag.k
    December 22, 2014

    Sir I love your blogs I like to know about the different cultures.Our school is following you THE ORBIS SCHOOL

  76. Jonathan Allen
    December 23, 2014

    Nearly in your third year of travelling, my now 9 year old son has finally twigged what you’re up to (I think the phrase about a mule ‘calculating the odds’ struck a bell!) – looking forward to his own journey following yours – Travel Safely – will be thinking of you during our holidays.

  77. Shruti Agrawal
    December 24, 2014

    Hi Sir,
    Wish you Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.Have a safe and enjoyable journey ahead!

  78. Linda Hoernke
    December 31, 2014

    Enjoyable post Paul!! Thank you again and Happy New Year!

  79. Tyler Overmier
    January 5, 2015

    Hi Paul,
    I find it awesome how you can travel the world in God’s footsteps. Hopefully you had a wonderful Christmas and good luck in your future travels!

  80. ilya
    January 12, 2015

    good gob Paul well done :)! ! !

  81. Mary Chamie
    January 14, 2015

    Great fun. Keep it up.

  82. Deb Baral
    February 10, 2015

    Thanks Paul for the link to the CBC interview. I can’t seem to get enough!

  83. v.kolence
    February 28, 2015

    mr.salopek regarding your mule’s brain power, remember the song “if you don’t really like to go to school…you might grow up to be a mule”? what an adventure you are on! I am amazed!

  84. ana regina
    April 22, 2016

    Wow I didn’t knew all of that until I read the article its incredible!

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