National Geographic

Camel-ology

Tayib Essem, Saudi Arabia, 28°33'37" N, 34°48'01" E

You must allow camels a generous rest at midday. This improves their dispositions.

You must avoid walking camels on stones—a camel’s foot is not a hard hoof but a smooth pad, soft as a pot holder. (Our older bull, Fares, will take your shoulder between his jaws as you lead him with a rope, and squeeze gently, communicating his distress on sharp rocks.)

A camel can travel three to five days without water. Some Bedouin claim, in admiration, that the animals can endure thirst even longer—for weeks, even months. It is not advisable to test these assertions, born of dizzy love.

While traveling, feed your camels twice a day, morning and night: one lozenge of alfalfa a hand-span thick and one bucket of grain when available. They also will eat orange rinds, banana peels, stale flatbread, plastic bubble wrap encasing laptop computers, the living hair off your scalp, and a thousand different varieties of grasses, thorns, shrubs, and trees. Do not be alarmed by the breadth of a camelid’s palate. Their stomachs are made of titanium. If they do suffer indigestion, however, you must grab them by the nostrils until they vomit, typically unburdening themselves all over your shoes.

Do not pamper your animal. A camel is your partner in work, not a pet. You must look into its gigantic, sable eyes and address it firmly. You can reward it with ear scratches.

Never hit your animal: Camels remember. (The Prophet Muhammad is said to have comforted a weeping camel he found tied to a post in Medina: The camel, its fur wet with tears, bemoaned its master’s mistreatment. The Prophet sought out the owner and berated him harshly.)

You can work a single camel for many years . . . and there will still be 70,000 secrets you will never learn from it. The Ambassador of Yemen in Djibouti told me this.

To pack a cargo camel is to confront a daunting problem of geometry, of architecture: the hump. The placement of the saddle is critical. It cannot be an inch too far forward, or an inch too far back. The camel will complain otherwise. It will roll in the sand. No one hump is like any other hump. Thus, you must achieve loading perfection on just one. Awad Omran, my Sudanese camel handler, packs Seema. I pack Fares. We do this three times a day (dawn, midday, dusk). It is a pleasing ritual that connects us to these large, fatalistic, self-satisfied animals through our hands. I will miss it dearly in the industrialized Northern Hemisphere, where I will suffer, like everyone else, under the hegemony of cars.

There are 109 Comments. Add Yours.

  1. Joe
    December 12, 2013

    Wonderful insight into the life of the camels you lead.

  2. Tevan
    December 12, 2013

    Thanks much for good infos regarding the camels. I wish I could have walked with you too in Arabian deserts which I love dearly; would be my resting place.

  3. Evan
    December 12, 2013

    Hello Paul,
    I’ve been following your journey since your first dispatch, and check back every two or three days to make sure I haven’t missed a post. I love being transported somewhere else while reading of your travels, and the videos are always a treat. I hear what sounds like birds chirping at the end of this particular video–have you seen these birds while walking?
    Best of luck!
    Evan

    • Paul Salopek
      December 15, 2013

      The birds you hear in the video appeared to be swallows, Evan. Thousands upon thousands of them. They nest in the cliffs and were settling in for the night when we walked through the canyon called Tayeb Essem.

  4. Sharon Brevik
    December 12, 2013

    Wonderful information about your camels. Since travel has been my business for many years, I have been the one who has to kiss the camel to encourage my groups to take a camel ride. I have endured lots of sloppy, stringy kisses…….but enjoyed every minute. I have more closeup camel pictures than you can imagine. I am happy that you are kind to them……Really enjoying your posts……keep them coming….

    • Paul Salopek
      December 15, 2013

      I have never kissed Fares or Seema. I miss them, though. I had to leave them in Saudi Arabia. They are enjoying retirement at the desert farm of my logistician, Saeed Alfaidi, near Yanbu. He is smitten by these two stout-hearted companions, too, and will spoil them with an unending supply of alfalfa.

  5. David Robledo
    December 12, 2013

    Amazing inspiring and engulfing, I wish you well on this fantastic voyage

  6. Andrew Harper
    December 12, 2013

    I have completed numerous solo walks, and quickly realised that one is never alone when walking and working with camels. There is an unwritten mutual understanding that the journey is a team effort and the well respected camel will regard his ‘master’ as part of the herd.
    Enjoying your posts! Travel well!
    Andrew

  7. Kath Engler
    December 12, 2013

    The image of a camel attached to your shoulder communicating distress by gentle squeezing is lovely…perhaps I will use that technique in the future.

  8. yumma
    December 12, 2013

    Wow, amazing, i have actually rode a camel, feels kinda like they’re swaying

  9. Joyce Lee
    December 12, 2013

    Amazing journey. Thank you for sharing it with us. Safe journey.

  10. ASMA
    December 12, 2013

    When I tell my students stories about camels, they hardly believe me… I am sure I could have searched for evidence to show them, but yours was just perfect. I am now a horse person, but I find a pleasure talking about camels when I teach horses… I know that they have a lot of physiological and anatomical differences, but I have found them both to share so many similarities in their communication with humans. Just amazing. Are you planning to use common beasts in each leg of your journey or will your knees take some of that alone? Would love to see your reflection on two humped camels, reindeer, slid dogs and other beasts along the way… Stay well and cool.

  11. Jean Thompson
    December 12, 2013

    As always, I enjoyed the commentary and camel care lessons. However, the hobble on the camel’s hind legs looked too tight. It appears to be cutting into the legs. It bothered me.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 15, 2013

      It is a torsional hobble on the front legs, millenni-old technology devised by people who know camels. It loosens and slackens according to the animal’s stance. The animal itself determines the tightness.

  12. no1speacial
    December 12, 2013

    I cried after reading and watching this because i wish i could have a relationship with these animals. Thank you my friend.

  13. Linda Hoernke
    December 13, 2013

    Thank you for the insight in traveling with your four footed companions. The video was great…not only on the lesson in loading the camels but the beauty of traveling through the desert~~

  14. Sylvain Pascal
    December 13, 2013

    I have been following your journey since a few weeks now. The final images of your video are so inspiring. We humans always wonder what’s awaiting around the corner…

  15. Paul Keegan
    December 13, 2013

    Good stuff. :)

  16. Ajlin
    December 13, 2013

    Camels are the most amazing domesticated animal. They give humans everything, milk, meat, wool, hides, transport and they are very smart animals.
    I have ridden a camel three times in my life. I prefer them to horses.
    Although I love horses as well.
    I too think possibly the hobble was a little tight. I could be wrong, I’m not an expert.

  17. mohammad
    December 13, 2013

    dear paul
    you can see camel endearments all over the middle east.camels can be found as a company brand, as a family emblem and on the antique tea cups or the spoons on my grandmother`s cupboard.
    we even count them in the same way as humans!( 1 NAFAR means 1 PERSON and 1 NAFAR means 1 camel too!)
    mohammad from IRAN

    • Paul Salopek
      December 15, 2013

      As the Bedouin say: “Ata Allah”—God’s gift to humans. Fares and Seema were my ambassadors. Even hard-eyed police at checkpoints got mushy around them. Camels have a sort of slacker charisma. That unimpressed gaze. The walk will be much lonelier without them.

  18. rosario garcia
    December 13, 2013

    very informative and enjoyable!

  19. Anne Hunt
    December 13, 2013

    A beautiful ode to the camel! From your words (and having read your posts for the past year) I could hear and sense these steadfast companions. As always, thank you for your shared sight into other parts of the world. Your readers,too, will miss the “the camel-pace” of life when you finally reach the the more mechanized parts of your journey.

  20. Dennis Holseybrook
    December 13, 2013

    WOW, what a wonderful beast! First real analysis of a camel I have ever read. The best information is always “first hand and up close”. I give you a camel hug, thanks for the tips. Can the camel dung be used for anything? Regards.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 15, 2013

      Camel dung is used as cooking fuel in the Horn of Africa. I drank many a chai heated by it. Not a bad aroma at all. Musky incense.

  21. Cheri
    December 13, 2013

    Thank you for answering my question Paul. Delightful detail.
    Not sure what you meant by fatalistic.

    Imagine packing a dromedary!

  22. Aaron_of_Portsmouth
    December 13, 2013

    Paul, your commentary on the behavior of camels and the human-camel connection is so insightful and reminded me of the importance of humans maintaining a sense of deep respect for all animals and our duty as humans to be responsible for assisting and properly managing the environment. The Prophet Muhammad warned the Arabs not to over-burden the camels, according to certain Hadiths. I’ve always been fascinated by creatures, large and small, and understanding ecology and the ecosystem.
    The camel must have played a vital role in the journey of modern humans first from the continent of Africa into the Arab Peninsula, and eventually to populate the rest of the world. Your journey makes us take a pause, to reflect, and realize that we are in reality one species that has evolved and diversified into a variety of shapes and colors. This I’ve come to realize deeply as a Baha’i, and as a lover of science, nature, literature, and the arts.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 15, 2013

      Camels carried incense to the temples of Aphrodite in the Hellenistic world. They carried pink African gold to the ports of Abyssinia and papyrus manuscripts on optics and calculus to Timbuktu. They carried Islam from Tashkent to Fes in Morocco. They carried my Mac laptop to Jordan.

  23. Aaron_of_Portsmouth
    December 13, 2013

    I didn’t mean to imply that the camel came with us throughout our journey across the face of the earth. Fortunately, other animals became our companions into Asia, Europe and the Americas.

  24. Linda Bennett
    December 13, 2013

    I am 71 years old. I learned more about camels from this one post than I have my entire life. Thank you Paul

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      I think that’s a compliment. Thanks, Linda.

  25. Sabine
    December 13, 2013

    In three days I have completed reading your posts since you started. I feel breathless and giddy with excitement of what lies ahead. This is by far one of the best things I have encountered. Thank you and safe journey.

  26. Sally
    December 14, 2013

    How similar camels are to us – simlpy desire respect and nothing more. Thanks for your postings, Paul.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Yes. And a little unconditional love, too.

      • sally
        December 26, 2013

        unconditional love, need and then give.

  27. Delf
    December 14, 2013

    Your posts are marvellous ! I’m following you from the beginning, hope to be able to meet you on the road before the end (maybe in Patagonia. I’m OK to walk alone aswell if if you don’t agree). this post is greeeeennnn ! I decide rigt now this is my new life guide. I can apply it to my colleagues (and them to me I’m sure) and my family. Thank you for it and for all your trip. Take care.

  28. HikerBob
    December 14, 2013

    GREAT National Geographic cover and article, Paul. Thank you for doing this inspiring journey and teaching medium.
    HikerBob in Southern New Mexico

  29. Meena subramanian
    December 14, 2013

    Hi Paul: my husband showed me a recent Washington post article about you. I am now completely hooked on to your amazing stories. I feel like a kid in a candy story. So many stories and the best part is the links you attach.thanks so much.i will follow you all the way to Chile. Safe travels.

  30. wendy sloan
    December 14, 2013

    I have read the National Geographic article, loving the whole story so far. I do agree that the ropes around the camel’s ankles looked too tight, but they didn’t seem to complain. Thank you so much for this fascinating journey you are sharing with all of us!

  31. Margaret Connell Szasz
    December 14, 2013

    An incredible journey written with beautiful commentary. I will follow your stories and borrow them in my teaching of comparative Indigenous history. Thank you for your dedication and for taking us back to our ancestors’ travels.

  32. Margaret Connell Szasz
    December 14, 2013

    Thanks again.

  33. Diane strobl
    December 15, 2013

    Thinking of you with snow in your area. Hope you found a warm place in your travels.

  34. Marcia
    December 15, 2013

    Caro Paul,
    Estou contigo todo o momento apos a leitura da reportagem na Revista Geographic!!!
    Penso em vc e em seu guia qdo tomo um suco, ou me banho…
    A partir de agora me considero parte da sua expedição!! Boa sorte, estou contigo!!

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Obrigado por se juntar a viagem, Marcia.

  35. Bob Wilson
    December 15, 2013

    This is absolutely a great piece, I look forward to each update. Stay safe!

  36. dale
    December 15, 2013

    Just read your NG article-I will enjoy following your journey.Good luck!!

  37. Fiona Wilson
    December 16, 2013

    Hi Paul, a friend who is in the Middle East just put me onto your story. I am now hooked and will follow it to the end. Good luck.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Glad to have you along, Fiona.

  38. Cody Pyle
    December 16, 2013

    Looking out towards your Americas leg; I was thinking that you would switch to mules ? …
    Anyways … appreciating the blog of your trek !

  39. Yo
    December 16, 2013

    What a great article. I have ridden a camel once, it’s quite fun and since I live in Israel, I see them regularly. Maybe it’s time for another ride.

  40. NANCY BUJANG
    December 17, 2013

    Great read. I will be following your progress from now on. Good luck and all the best, Paul

  41. Luis C. Olivencia-Font MD
    December 17, 2013

    Dear Paul every world traveller is seen the world with you, even I have the advantage of being a flight surgeon in the USAF and being in Saudi in multiple occasions
    I’m following your whereabouts very closely, hope I’m in Chile waiting for you.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      I’ll send up a flare if I require your services, Luis.

  42. Roy marion
    December 17, 2013

    Great walk andvideos,years ago came upon a newly born camel in Ethiopia along the omo river,mother and baby were doing fine.thank you for your journey,roy

  43. Dora Gonzalez
    December 17, 2013

    Amazing journey this is, every step every picture and observation, is an unbelievable moment of knowledge!!!!

  44. mike roberts
    December 18, 2013

    Thanks so much for sharing this epic journey with those of us who are weighted by all the cares and concerns of life, I have always wished I could make a trek similar to what you are doing. Maybe the next life. Be safe and Merry Christmas.

  45. francois de verteuil
    December 18, 2013

    Dear Paul; If you ever get a bit discouraged, just think of all those whose lives are enhanced by following in your footsteps . Keep healthy. Francois de Verteuil

  46. tom
    December 18, 2013

    howdy paul, a wonderful description of hiking with a pack animal. I have been hiking with a b.l.m. wild burro I adopted since 1992. they have “cast iron” digestive systems like the camel, can live on reduced amounts of water and other similarities. perhaps it is their common ancestry in the deserts of n. Africa? pack animals are a stunning means of travel. (with effort required!) your words are so descriptive and your visuals “take the journey home”……

  47. Bob Schwarz
    December 18, 2013

    What a privilege to “take” this journey of the century in the comfort of my desk chair ! Hope Paul has got adequate security. Buy the way, I’ve heard camels hate to work. Rode on once in Egypt.

  48. Sonja Kodric
    December 19, 2013

    You have so many great features on the websites – here’s the first time I find the videos. I love the silences and natural feeling in Camel-ology. That was roasting fresh green coffee beans in the end, right? Nice. Hafta smile when someone wakes the sleeping person ‘let’s go’ – and he has to ask ‘where?’

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Awad was always asking where. He was the rationalist among us.

  49. Cynthia
    December 19, 2013

    I just read about your journey in Saturday’s Toronto Star (Neely Tucker’s article). What a marvellous undertaking! I can’t wait to read your next dispatch. Wishing you much joy in your journey.

  50. sandra hamm
    December 19, 2013

    you are very lucky. not that i would ever want to do that, but you do so that makes you lucky. when i saw the map of your journey a strange feeling came over me. it was like a nostalgic feeling of taking that half forgotten trip but without the visuals, just the feeling. do you experience that?

  51. darcy
    December 19, 2013

    My 8th grade Earth Science class has started following your adventure….we love it! thank you for the historical, cultural, and scientific aspects of your blogs. We have a few questions if you have time to get back to us: Do you hunt to get your food? pack it all with you? or rely on the generosity of others?How do you charge your phone and what are you doing for christmas?What happens if you get injured while you are on this journey?

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Darcy—delighted your students are following along. Their questions are good ones—and most of them are answered in past dispatches. As for Christmas, I’ll be walking, probably near the Dead Sea.

  52. nathan
    December 19, 2013

    how often do you have to load a camal

  53. Gay
    December 19, 2013

    I just finished reading about your amazing journey in National Geographic. Godspead Paul. I will pray for you along the way as you continue to discover the wonderful world God created for us to experience and joy. Thank you so much for sharing this incredible journey with us. I look forward to the next 6 years!

  54. Sue Cummings
    December 19, 2013

    Simply amazing. What a beautiful journey to share with me and humanity. I am blessed by your journey.

  55. morgan hastings
    December 20, 2013

    hey paul, this is morgan (the french horn playing kid from SB whom you rented a room from Kit…) saw you on pbs and it’s really inspiring to see what you’re doing. adventuring and experiencing is what we’re all about. stay safe!

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Great to hear from you, Morgan. Saludos to you and your mom.

  56. keith schroder
    December 20, 2013

    Thanks for your reports on the camels. My wife and I raise alpacas, their distant north american cousins. Camelids do eat a lot of things. Fortunately, black berries and poison oak are among them. They also do have minds and individual personalities of their own. We appreciate your taking them so seriously. They are quite intelligent and seem to have long memories. And they can form close attachments, with each other and with humans. Your camels may well miss you when you leave them, and welcome you back if you should ever return to them.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Keith—no surprise that the Bedouin have hundreds if not thousands of tales regarding camel memory. The pastoralists say camels they haven’t seen in years will plod out of a strange herd and approach their former owners from hundreds of yards away. I miss my two camels. We went through a lot together.

  57. Mrs. Ranjana das ( India)
    December 20, 2013

    Hi Paul, I read my nat geog magazine, the interactive version , on my ipad,the current issue covering your walk is so amazing. I admire your courage and conviction to take on something so daunting a task.We will at last get to know the travails the Homo sapiens went through to discover the world. We owe it to you for all the valuable info. Do take care. May god be kind to you and grant you the strength to go on. I’m truly happy that a brave soul of our times through his hardships will go down In history as the Most Daring One. I will follow your stories every day. Merry Christmas to you and your family. Wish you the very best in this very precious endeavour and yes! Wish you Safe walking.

    • Paul Salopek
      December 24, 2013

      Thank you, Mrs. Das.

  58. patti littlecreek
    December 20, 2013

    I love following you along your trial and reading your stories. I check each way of contact (ie poscard, lab, etc) and devour your stories and information. Thanks again! Godspeed

  59. patti littlecreek
    December 20, 2013

    that is supposed to be “trail” not trial. thought I proof-read ok but missed this! :)

  60. Jane White
    December 21, 2013

    I have only just started following your journey (after reading my NG) and hooked already. Especially loved your Camel-ology! Thanks for sharing this.

  61. Larry Perkins
    December 21, 2013

    Had I been asked at the outset of your journey whether every post would be fresh, informative, stirring, intellectually challenging, even emotional, I’d have laughed and declared, “Impossible.” And I would have been dead wrong. Not a single one of your dispatches, from Day One, has been without those engaging attributes and more, always expressed in your poetic/prose style. Thank you, Paul, for a near-miraculous unbroken series of, for lack of any other word, “reporting”.

  62. Norma
    December 24, 2013

    Paul, hopefully, toward the end of your trip you’ll see guanacos in the Patagonia. I understand they are the descendents, together with alpacas and llamas, of camels that existed in the Americas before the Europeans arrived.

  63. HikerBob
    December 24, 2013

    Great issue of National Geographic about your Walk. Paul, research points to distribution of camel species through much of your forthcoming path. Will you continue to use camels?

  64. Gail Dwight
    December 27, 2013

    I’m enjoying your journey through the middle east, and love the camel info. I rode camels outside of Cairo in 1969. They are truly magnificent animals.
    Good luck on your journey and God bless.

  65. Chris Chiappa
    December 27, 2013

    New to your posts, but am already enriched by them. Thank you.

  66. Irene Shaw
    December 28, 2013

    I admire your strength and determination

  67. Deborah Raven-Lindley
    December 29, 2013

    For whatever reason, I sat down this morning and decided to read the beginning of your story in my Nat Geo while I drank my coffee. I farm, often alone for long stretches, in northern California, and find great value in concepts of life and reflections on humanity….things to ponder, while I work. The layers of significance in your writing are astounding…from the most mundane to the commonalities that unite all humans. I don’t think you are crazy to take this journey at all…I can only wonder just how much you will discover. I will now think of you often…and, I’ve never worked with camels though a friend who lived years in Oman has told me of them…wonderful descriptions!

    • Sonja Kodric
      December 29, 2013

      Awad the rationalist – nice. Thanks so much for your reply – it’s amazing that you can give such thoughtful regard to your followers.

    • Sonja Kodric
      December 29, 2013

      Awad the rationalist – nice. I’ve Thanks so much for your reply – it’s amazing that you can give such thoughtful regard to your followers.

  68. Zara Nesbitt
    December 31, 2013

    Your Alaskan leg is going to take you by our place…or near enough. My husband and I would love to open our house to you and your companions.

    –Inspired by the idea of a new perspective attained in a simple manner.

    Thanks- Zara & Tracy

    • Paul Salopek
      January 15, 2014

      Very kind, Zara. Drop me a note when I get closer—when I’m inching your way through Siberia. Warm regards.

  69. Effalee
    January 1, 2014

    LOVE it!

  70. Anita Cage
    January 3, 2014

    So glad I found this series, it’s grand.

  71. Bronwyn
    January 3, 2014

    Thank you for loving, funny advice. I have always admired this noble critters, and would dearly love to meet one. They truly are the God’s gift to the people of the desert.

  72. Joan
    January 7, 2014

    I already love and miss your camels.

    • Paul Salopek
      January 15, 2014

      I do too, Joan.

  73. anastasia
    January 23, 2014

    After reading this post and watching the gentle packing of Fares and Seema I became extremely emotional and shed big sloppy tears, this also happened a few days ago when I spotted a young grey whale migrating north off the shore of Limantour Beach in Point Reyes. I believe my reaction to these precious animals is about their precarious future and all of our precarious futures but there is also something else I can’t quite put my finger on yet, perhaps its the sheer beauty of creation in both these creatures. Each going about their business one wave at a time and one potholder in front of the other without any technological interference! May all the tears shed gather in a pool to quench the thirst of a 100,000 camels.

  74. Dalton
    February 1, 2014

    Paul, your journey is truly an inspiration. I recently saw the article in Nat Geo, and I had to check out the following here. Ever since I was a child my life’s ambition has been to see the world. I don’t mean the tourist hot spots but all the nitty gritty where people and culture thrive. Your quest to understand humanity has put my dream into a realistic perspective. You have my following now.
    Missouri USA.

    I love the way you personify the camels. I can see how much you respect them. :)

  75. Jennifer Millican
    February 2, 2014

    I was telling a stranger beside me in the dentist office about my camel and he asked if they were “like these” holding up a National Geographic. Wow! I am so excited to get to follow you on your adventure. It will not be the same without your camels, but exciting none the less.
    I am in Rudy, AR and have started adding camels to our farm for milk and fiber. That is what I thought they were going to be for, but I no see that the greatest thing that I get from them is their amazing personalities. We have a huge old mama, her baby born this Christmas eve, and a 4 month old bottle baby. If you need some camel affection in the us of a give us a call.
    Thank you for this adventure

  76. Jennifer Millican
    February 2, 2014

    I was telling a stranger beside me in the dentist office about my camel and he asked if they were “like these” holding up a National Geographic. Wow! I am so excited to get to follow you on your adventure. It will not be the same without your camels, but exciting none the less.
    I am in Rudy, AR and have started adding camels to our farm for milk and fiber. That is what I thought they were going to be for, but I no see that the greatest thing that I get from them is their amazing personalities. We have a huge old mama, her baby born this Christmas eve, and a 4 month old bottle baby. If you need some camel affection in the us of a give us a call.

    • Paul Salopek
      February 6, 2014

      National Geographic owes a large part of its audience to dentists. Great to see that camels are repopulating North America. (They were there until the Holocene.) Welcome, Jennifer.

  77. Day Man
    February 6, 2014

    Great job doing the thing you cute thing you

  78. Miguel Garcia
    February 6, 2014

    Thank you I’ll take that into consideration for my pet camel!

  79. Miguel Garcia
    February 6, 2014

    I’ll take that into consideration for my pet camel!

  80. Linda Stepp
    February 6, 2014

    I love animals! I envy you in experiencing these wonderful camels that often populate some of my favorite literature yet remain so out of my reach. Next time you see one you know (?) give it a scratch by the ears for me. Peace be with you as I follow your words to this new experience.

  81. Erin Cizina
    February 16, 2014

    Hi Paul ~~~
    I’m just curious. Is Adam Jefferson’s middle name really “Jabari” or is that a nickname? And if it’s a nickname, how did he get it?

    Thanks for the videos. I enjoy seeing what your campsites are like, who you are travelling with, and to hear the sounds of the day.
    Safe travels

  82. Sami aljohani
    February 26, 2014

    نشونال جيوغرافيك ولولو البحر الاحمر والمدينه المنوره♻️

  83. Ben
    March 26, 2014

    Hi Paul
    Do you like camels.
    I have always wondered what a camel is like. Are they nice, are they stubborn, are they gentle? And what do they feel like, are they soft, are they smooth? Do they look different in person, then they do in pictures? And what do their humps feel like?

  84. Win
    April 19, 2014

    I certainly hope you do not need the services of Luis the flight surgeon Paul, however I do have great regard for them since one delivered our first born son just over 50 years ago now in France.

  85. Win
    April 19, 2014

    I’m curious Paul. Who do you find more difficult to leave – your human companions or your animal? You’ve already had to say so many goodbyes, but then there are always the hellos to look forward to as well! Happy to be back traveling with you again in my armchair. Stay safe.

  86. John
    June 3, 2014

    Hope to walk in your steps somewhere in the americas

  87. graham
    June 17, 2014

    I want to get a pet camel. I’m nine.

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